Posts Tagged With: things to do in Western Australia

 
 

Uncovering the secrets of Shark Bay with Capes


For the audio-story, please click here

The wisdom is already there. It always was. It´s only been buried deep within, hidden in plain sight by avalanches of information, opinions, and thought-streams… I must have dozed off, and met Yoda in my dreams. Or, maybe, the words belong to Capes, who I am gonna meet later? In any case, a glance on the mobile phone is indicating that getting a move on is the adequate thing to do now. Siesta nap time officially over, Indigenous Australian adventures are a go!


After a short van-ride from our hostel, we arrive at our destination. Through the window, I catch a first glimpse of who would be our guide for the next hours. Can you recognize charisma from afar? I don´t know the answer to that question, but what I do know is that Darren “Capes” Capeswell is a pretty charismatic fella.



Tales by Capes: Enchanted by Indigenous Australian traditions


A big, broad smile, a strong, yet not brutally domineering handshake, and an unmistakable aura of undeniable authority surrounding him make me feel excited and intrigued as to what´s about to come. Mentioned in the Lonely Planet Australia travel guide book as well as other notable travel publications, Capes from Wula Gura Nyinda Eco Cultural Adventures surely knows how to draw you in. The time we spend learning from him about all kinds of local “bushtucker” while taking a walk through the dunes close to the Indian Ocean is truly time well spent.


What the hell is bushtucker, you might ask? Sounds kinda weird. Well, the Aussies have a penchant for unusual/ cute/ very specific terms, and bushtucker is just one of them. Bushtucker is…. drumroll, kangaroos jumping out of a hat, sharks waving goodbye to sexy surfers, sounds of Waltzing Matilda emerging from nowhere… (did I get every Aussie cliche right here? Feel free to add some in the comments :P) …


Back to the question at hand: Bushtucker is bushfood, so any food native to Australia and originally used by Indigenous Australians. It can serve culinary as well as medicinal purposes, as Capes explains to us while we explore the bushland close to Little Lagoon and Monkey Mia. He then continues on to lead us to a stunning location – a tranquil setting by the beach, where everything is set up for a campfire.


An evening by the bay: Aboriginal sound-magic for him and her


Is it romantic? You bet it is! The sun is setting over the Indian Ocean, painting the sky in all hues of rose, dark orange and purple, while our group of six gathers around the fireplace, ready for some more fascinating insights into the original Indigenous Australian way of life. One of the many intriguing things we learn from Capes is that…hold on to your horses, ahem koalas…that the world-famous musical instrument didgeridoo is actually not supposed to be played by women! They play huge shells instead.



Huge, maybe even basketball sized shells? Thats right. It´s quite a distinct experience to give this a shot – feeling the cool yet sharp features of the shell against your lips, while the fresh night-air is caressing your skin. And – it´s at least as bloody hard to get a sound out of that mysterious shell than it is to entice the didge to let loose and play along to your own intended song. But – don´t take my word for it, give it a crack yourself next time you come across a massive shell!


Welcome to Gutharraguda-ways


We spend some more time in Capes charming company, whose cultural heritage is partly Malgana, partly Nhanda, and learn some Indigenous Australian vocabulary specific to the original landowners of Shark Bay. Did you know that Shark Bay is called Gutharraguda, meaning “two bays” in Malgana? Malgana is in fact only one of the three Aboriginal language groups spoken in Shark Bark, the traditional country of the three Aboriginal language groups Malgana, Nhanda and Yingkarta.



There are about 130 registered Aboriginal heritage sites in the Shark Bay area alone, so make sure to explore and honor the powerful roots of this ancient and very special part of Down Under so that you may get to experience the enchantment that only members of the world´s oldest living civilization can transmit. After all that quality Aboriginal-and-nature-exploration, it is time to let the myriad of new impressions sink in and head hostel-home. The next morning would lead us to an up north paradise, after all!


Wild Wild Western ways: Cranky kookaburras, cool kangaroos, and chilled-out cows


Fast forward around 10 hours and 556 kilometres on the road, including an interesting stop at a subtropical banana plantation in Carnavaron, the so-called fruit bowl of Western Australia, and we arrive at our final road trip destination on Australia´s stunning Coral Coast. On this last leg of our road trip adventure, we have witnessed the distances between towns getting bigger and bigger and we have listened to the shrieking sounds of Kookaburra-birds and parrots. We have also been witness to more and more roos (kangaroos) as well as cows greeting us with their stoic demeanour, and sometimes taking their sweet time while crossing our road-path, gifting us with some moments to take it all in and adapt to a natural, slower pace of life.


It´s also been intriguing to observe the land around us slowly but surely reflecting the transformation from a mediterranean to a tropical climate zone with all the changes in vegetation that that entails. Endless seeming roads have led us past tiny towns, and past the vast, rough red outback to our right, and the equally immense and powerful Indian Ocean to our left.



Arriving at our final destination: Camping allures in Coral Bay


But that´s all done and dusted now, as I whisper G´day, Ningaloo Marine Park, while stepping out of the van, already feeling like a part-time-Aussie. We are not alone anymore, as camper vans upon camper vans stretching out in front of us indicate. You could almost say that Coral Bay is a unique melange of camper-van-village meets ocean paradise!


Camping sites in Coral Bay are so popular that they are often booked out for months in advance. For the most part, they are populated by massive camper vans, or rather full-on camper castles. Many of them are inhabited by incredibly lucky pensioners, who get to meander along pure-piece-of-paradise-Coral-Bay-beach every day, saying hello to wild salmon and sea turtles passing them by and immersing themselves in a piece of barely touched nature-heaven.


If your definition of paradise includes wild and friendly animals approaching you of their own accord, pristine air, crystal clear ocean waters, unbelievably fine white sand, and loads of that gorgeousness all to yourself – then Coral Bay is gonna make you think you have passed on and have arrived right in heaven city.


Could that paradise include sharks? And fish the size of a small car? And a myriad of adventures yet to be told? Yes, yes, and yes. Come join me another time, when we get to venture out onto, and yep, right into the ocean with a very chilled marine biologist, and get to discover what exactly makes Ningaloo Marine Park and Coral Bay so out-of-this-world-mindblowing. You won´t regret it. Pinky promise!



Handy information part:

To join Capes and his team on his cultural tours in Shark Bay which include 4×4 tours, kayaking tours, and camping tours, head to the Wula Gura Nyinda Eco Cultural Adventures website or Facebook-page and get in touch! Have fun 🙂


Healing tip: To protect our amazing oceans and help reduce our plastic waste, here are two action-steps you can take to reduce plastic in your life:

1. Get your groceries from farmers markets or farmers nearby, which means no plastic packaging, and usually way healthier food for you, so it´s a win-win.

2. Buy as little plastic-products as possible – it´s a challenge, but what a great challenge to take! You might feel inspired by the Zero Waste Lifestyle. Great first steps to take are bringing a reusable cup to coffee-shops and bringing your own bags to do shopping.

3. If you enjoy donating to a good cause: You can find some great organizations who fight to protect ocean-life here.


Back to you, dear reader: Are there any hidden beach-gems in your country that you could share with us? And who are your country´s Indigenous people/ tribes? As always, would love to hear from you! Also, feel free to get a copy of my latest e-book “How to feel at home while traveling” here, if you haven´t already. It might just make your next trip that little bit sweeter/ more sensual and relaxed 🙂

Categories: Posts in English, Reiselust- Hungry for travel, Reisen | Tags: , , , , , , | 26 Comments
 
 

Western Australian adventures: Getting up, down, and dirty


For the audio-story, please click here

How does wide open space feel? Like floating. Like being brought to your knees. Like tasting humility, the limitations of being human, and the might of something much vaster than yourself. It does not feel like Europe one bit, I can tell you that much. At least not the Europe I know, the Europe of the mind, of questioning everything a thousand times before putting it into reality, of letting mind and reason reign over the impulses of your heart, your gut, your most essential self.


This is Western Australia, the land of wild untouched dirt, of colors so intense they make you gasp for air and beg for mercy, as such natural beauty is rarely to be found in places where civilization and man-made card houses of self-importance hold the dice on the playing field of life. 


Driving through the Wild Wild West: Aboriginal Dreams-time in Geraldton


The red dirt to my right, the stark bluest blue you´ll ever see a sky painted in above, the many shades of blue/ turquoise/ greens/ dark emeralds of the mighty Indian Ocean to my left… that is the colorful ground tenor to the symphony of this road trip-adventure. It´s my first going the whole way from Western Australia´s laid-back capital Perth up to Coral Bay aka my latest definition of paradise.



Our first bigger stop is Geraldton, 424 kilometres north of the state capital, Perth. With its around 38.000 inhabitants, it´s a big town in Western Australia – a small one by European standards, though, where people can often be found anywhere you look/walk/sit/breathe. Once our van arrives safely in Geraldton, we do the things we as humans need to do – eat, move, again, breathe. And we do things humans have the privilege of doing, like marveling at art.


Geraldton Art Gallery: Journeying back in Aboriginal time


As I spot the advertisement for an Aboriginal art exhibition at the local art gallery, I suddenly feel as if I´m thrown back in time. I had always felt deeply drawn to Indigenous Australian´s spirituality, wisdom, and art – so much so that back in 2002 I had basically copied every word of a book on the topic into my diary. And that was long before I even knew that I would end up living Down Under for quite a while…


The book had whispered some of the secrets of true magic to me – not the magic that is used nowadays at every turn to market and sell, no, the magic that is as or more real than the lines you are reading right now. The magic of living in unison with all of creation, and of dancing, singing, and sensing your way through the many circles of life. The magic of things unspoken, of veils unbroken, and bonds forged in the forgotten realms of an ethereal home. 



Ancient art in modern spaces 


Following the longings of my heart, I step into the Geraldton Regional Art Gallery and bathe myself in the imagery. The Aboriginal paintings invite me to travel back in time, more specifically around 75.000 years in time, when the first Aboriginal Australians, descendants of the first people ever to leave Africa (here´s to bravery!) arrived in Australia. Granted, the paintings were not THAT bloody old, of course!


For artistic evidence dating back tens of thousands of years, there´s no better way than to check out some original Rock art like the one I had been able to admire on a trip to the Pilbara region of Western Australia. But that´s a story for another time and post, my mates.


The paintings which were on display in Geraldton, meanwhile, did open a window into the Indigenous Australian culture for me through their brilliant storytelling clothed in symbols/ icons, a chronical used to transmit knowledge of the land, events, and beliefs of the Aboriginal people.



The first painting posted above might look deceivingly simple to the uninformed onlooker – who most likely won´t know about a very intriguing and kinda secret characteristic of Indigenous Australian Art. According to the Artlandish Aboriginal Art Gallery in Kununurra, Aboriginal artists will denote the “outside” story which they prepare for their non-indigenous audience whilst the full “inside” story can be understood only to those with the appropriate level of knowledge. Pretty fascinating, right?

The second artwork showcases a common motive in Aboriginal art. Many Indigenous Aussie paintings consist of thousands of  meticulously created “dots”. More specifically, it´s Western Desert art which is given its unique character through the use of dots.  Executed the traditional way, it takes the artist hundreds of hours of precision and committed attentiveness just to create the background.

So, what do those dots actually stand for, you might ask? Well, they symbolize stars, sparks, burnt ground and the likes as the base of an Aboriginal painting is the organisation of the earth and the ancestral connection with it. Country, respect for country/ earth as well as Dreamtime are important pillars of Aboriginal culture and identity, after all.

The world´s oldest living culture definitely has a lot to teach us “young ones”, and I hope to learn much more about their wisdom and powerful ways of relating to all that is in the future. But ahem, losing track of time here…let´s get back to our roadtrip-adventure! 


Kalbarri explorations: From bloody old to bloody impressive


After a healthy lunch (or was it? Mmh…) overlooking the gorgeous myriad of shades of blue tainted waves of the imposing Indian Ocean, it was time to continue the journey to Kalbarri, more specifically the Kalbarri National Park, boasting impressive inland river gorges with really bloody old rock formations that are definitely older than your grandma. Or your great-grandma. Or your motherland, maybe. Depends where you live.



The relatively secluded National Park, 485 km north of Perth in the Midwest region of WA, entices adventurous visitors with its 400 million-year-old gorges as well as towering ocean cliffs. The Murchison river gorge runs for almost 80 km on the lower reaches of the Murchison River, but before you zone out because Murchison River who – take a look at the colorful power-presence that is Western Australia´s natural forces. You might have never seen a blue that deeply blue and a red that passionately alive red anywhere before!


The circle of life: The treasures of Kalbarri National Park


When out and about exploring the wonders of Kalbarri National Park, I couldn´t help myself and did a little Yoga and mindfulness practice on the incredible ancient lands, feeling her more deeply, letting her overtake my mind and being and dissolving into her magnificence.


Witnessing her entirely meant bowing to her powerful presence while taking in the sensations of warm rays of sunshine on my skin, a rush of chilly wind messing with my hair and cooling down my neck, and the panoramic views of seemingly endless wild nature all around me.



This might be a bit random, but bare with me – did you ever watch the movie “The Lion King” and remember the scene where little Simba was being held up to the sky and introduced to its fellow animal-friends? Not that I felt like a lion-cub (even though I might have let out a tiny roar when gazing upon those views), but the similarities between the scenery were pretty damn striking…:P


We ended up spending a good day exploring Kalbarri National Park – and ended up passing the night in a rather unexpected place while disturbing more than a few orderly citizens in the process. Read all about that cheeky adventure as well as my explorations of the incredible Shark Bay World Heritage Area next time!


Today´s healing action: Seeing that this post is all about stunning Australia, a place that is seriously hurting at the moment, I wanted to share a few links where you can donate to help:

Red Cross Australia – general disaster relief

WWF – help save koalas

If you believe in the power of prayer, that´s another way to help .

Last but not least, it´s a wonderful act of care for our planet to reduce our impact by reducing or eliminating meat consumption, offsetting emissions, and more. Also, check out this helpful article on ways to travel in a more eco-conscious way.


Back to you, dear reader: What´s your favorite National Park, and what do you love most about spending time there? As always, would love to hear from you!



Categories: Posts in English, Reiselust- Hungry for travel, Reisen | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 61 Comments

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